Are you on the lookout for a 3D printer? Do you have a specific budget in mind? We assessed and reviewed 10 of the best 3D printers now available at four different price ranges to assist you in making your pick.

Consumer 3D printers became quite popular about 3-4 years ago. Although there isn’t quite the same hype about 3D printing these days as there was back then, 3D printers remain popular among the maker community (which is steadily growing).

This guide will go over 10 of the top 3D printers currently available if you’re in the market for one. We’ve organised the guide by price point, so it’s not just a list of tens of thousands of dollars’ worth of 3D printers.

In fact, one of the better options on this list (hint: it’s the QIDI TECH I) is in the $500-$1,000 price bracket.

The guide examines two or three of the finest 3D printers for under $5,000, $2,000, $1,000, and $500.

*Please note that this article is solely about FFF (fused filament fabrication) printers. In the near future, we’ll write a separate post about resin 3D printers. Check out our list of the Best Cheap 3D Printers Under $500 if you’re searching for something more affordable.

Our Picks for the Best 3D Printers

The table below lists our top selections for the best 3D printers on the market right now. We chose the best 3D printer overall, as well as a runner-up, the best value option, and the best entry-level 3D printer.

NAME SPECS RATING
TOP PICK

Raise3D N2 Plus

  • 12″x12″x24″
  • 10 Microns
  • 1.75mm
  • Heated Bed
9.3/10

RUNNER-UP

Ultimaker 3 Extended

  • 9″x9″x12″
  • 20 Microns
  • 2.85mm
  • Heated Bed
9.1/10
VALUE

QIDI TECH I

  • 9″x6″x6″
  • 100 Microns
  • 1.75mm
  • Heated Bed
8.6/10
ENTRY

HICTOP Creality CR-10

  • 12″x12″x16″
  • 100 Microns
  • 1.75mm
  • PLA Only
8.0/10

*To learn more about the 3D printers featured above, simply link to go to our overview page for that machine. You can also scroll down to see more choices.

Best 3D Printers Under $5,000

There are a few 3D printers under $5,000 that you may choose from if you have a huge budget and require something that works more like an industrial-level machine than a consumer-grade equipment.

Raise3D’s N2 Plus is my favourite of the bunch. It’s a dependable printer with a large build volume and the capacity to print at resolutions of up to 10 microns. My next top pick is the Ultimaker 3 Extended, which is slightly more expensive than the N2 Plus, followed by the much less expensive LulzBot Taz 6.

Raise3D N2 Plus

  • 12″x12″x24″
  • 10 Microns
  • 1.75mm
  • Heated Bed
9.3/10

Check Price

Recommendation

The Raise3D N2 Plus and N2 are true workhorses with some of the best specifications available among consumer-grade 3D printers. The N2 Plus has a massive build volume of 12′′ x 12′′ x 24′′ and can achieve maximum z layer heights (resolutions) of up to 10 microns. Overall, the N2 Plus and N2 are excellent choices for hobbyists and professionals looking for a dependable printer that can produce high-quality prints.

TECH SPECS

VOLUME 12″x12″x24″
RESOLUTION 10 microns
FIL. SIZE 1.75mm
MATERIALS PLA/ABS/PC/PETG
PORTS WiFi/USB/SD Card/Ethernet
PLATFORM Heated Bed
WEIGHT ~143 lbs.

Raise3D N2 Plus Overview

While the Ultimaker 3 Extended is a well-known machine, Raise3D, a slightly less well-known 3D printer firm, may provide an even better alternative for power users.

The Raise3D N2 Plus has a much larger build volume than the Ultimaker 3 Extended (12′′ x 12′′ x 24′′). (and anyone else for that matter.) With a z-layer resolution of 10 microns, the N2 Plus can print at even greater resolutions than the Ultimaker 3. (20 microns.)

And the N2 Plus does so for $500-$700 cheaper than the Ultimaker 3 Extended (depending on whether you want a second extrusion).

Raise3D also sells a normal N2 (fourth image in the table below) with a reduced build volume of 12′′ x 12′′ x 12′′, which is still one of the larger build volumes among the 3D printers on our list.

As previously stated, both versions of the N2 have the option of adding a second extruder.

The N2 3D printers have a plethora of connecting choices as well. The N2 and N2 Plus can be connected through WiFi, USB, SD Card, or ethernet.

One of the most interesting aspects of the N2 and N2 Plus is the internal battery, which allows the printer to continue printing a project even if power is lost. This is a fantastic feature because nothing is more aggravating than being 20-30 hours into a large print and having to restart from the beginning.

However, the N2 Plus and N2 have one drawback: their large size. The N2 Plus weighs in at roughly 145 pounds, while the normal N2 weighs in at just under 120 pounds.

However, if cost isn’t an issue and you’re searching for the best 3D printer on the market, I’d recommend the N2 and N2 Plus over the Ultimaker 3 and 3 Extended merely because of the larger build volume, higher print resolution, and lower pricing.

Recommendation

If you’re looking for the best of the best in terms of prosumer and high-end consumer-level 3D printers, the Ultimaker 3 Extended is a must-see. The Ultimaker 3 Extended stands out as one of the top 3D printers currently available because to its large build volume, ability to hit high-resolution prints, two extruders, wifi connectivity, and quick print times.

TECH SPECS

VOLUME 9″x9″x12″
RESOLUTION 20 microns
FIL. SIZE 2.85mm
MATERIALS PLA/ABS
PORTS WiFi/USB/SD Card
PLATFORM Heated Bed
WEIGHT ~24 lbs.

Ultimaker 3 Extended Overview

The Ultimaker 3 Extended has a build space of 9′′ x 9′′ x 12′′, dual extruders, and print resolutions of up to 20 microns, allowing it to print huge things with great finish quality.

Of course, the high print resolution, multiple extruders, and big build volume all come at a cost. By far the most costly 3D printer on this list is the Ultimaker 3 Extended.

The Ultimaker 3 Extended, on the other hand, is a respectable option for individuals who can afford it and require a trustworthy machine.

The regular Ultimaker 3 is also available. It’s essentially the same machine, but with a smaller construction platform of 9′′ x 9′′ x 8′′.

The Ultimaker 3 is praised for its capacity to simplify the printing process as much as possible in both variants. The auto bed-leveling technology included with Ultimaker’s 3rd generation 3D printers is a big component of that.

The Ultimaker 3 can be connected through wifi (as well as USB and SDCard) and has an integrated camera that allows you to view your prints in real time.

The Ultimaker 3 can also print at speeds up to 300 mm/s. As a result, it’s one of the fastest 3D printers on the list. (While faster isn’t necessarily better, the Ultimaker 3 is capable of producing high-quality prints at these speeds.)

When it comes to prosumer and high-end 3D printers, the Ultimaker 3 Extended (and the standard Ultimaker 3) are easily among the best.

Recommendation

I can’t speak highly enough of the LulzBot Taz 6’s dependability as a printer owner. In reality, any of LulzBot’s printers (I’ve also dealt with the Taz 5 and Mini) can do the same thing. The Taz 6 isn’t quite as good as the somewhat more expensive Raise3D N2 and is significantly more expensive than the MakerGear M2, but it’s still a good open-source alternative with a lot of upgrade options and produced by a respectable firm.

TECH SPECS

VOLUME 11″x11″x10″
RESOLUTION 50 microns
FIL. SIZE 3.00
MATERIALS ABS/PLA/HIPS
PORTS USB/SD Card
PLATFORM Heated Bed
WEIGHT ~43 lbs.

LulzBot Taz 6 Overview

I have a LulzBot Taz 6 that I adore. I’ve used both the Taz 5 and the original LulzBot Mini, and the one thing I know about LulzBot machines is their dependability. In fact, even though my Taz 6 hasn’t been used in months, it still works like new.

However, the LulzBot Taz 6 isn’t without flaws. The open-air structure of the Taz 6 is one of its drawbacks. This isn’t a bad feature, however when printing in ABS, an enclosed printer helps to reduce temperature differential, which keeps the ABS from warping.

Fortunately, LulzBot now sells an enclosure to aid with this issue.

With a build volume of 11′′ x 11′′ x 10′′, the Taz 6 is on par with the Ultimaker 3 Extended and somewhat behind the Raise3D N2 (not the Plus). The Taz 6 is also less expensive than both of those devices.

LulzBot’s flagship printer can also print at a resolution of 50 microns. In that regard, it can’t quite compete with Ultimaker and Raise3D, but 50 microns is still fairly good in the larger scheme of things.

It prints at a maximum speed of 200 mm/s and has a typical print speed of 30-50 mm/s.

The features and accessories offered, as well as the variety of different filaments it supports, are among the most appealing aspects of the LulzBot Taz 6. A twin extruder, an Aerostruder tool head (for improved cooling), a MOARstruder (for faster printing speeds), or a single or dual Flexystruder can all be added to the Taz 6. (to print in flexible materials).

PLA, ABS, PVA, HIPS, wood filaments, Polyester, PETT, bronze, copper, stainless steel-based filaments, Polycarbonate, Nylon, PETG, and many other materials are supported by the Taz 6.

While LulzBot’s competitors make the Taz 6 a less appealing option, whether due to feature sets or price, the Taz 6 is still a good buy if you need a dependable printer with a huge print volume and don’t want to spend more than $3,000.

Under $2,000, the Best 3D Printers

The MakerGear M2 outperforms all others in the sub-$2,000 price bracket. For a long time, it’s been one of the most popular 3D printers among makers, and it’s been known for its dependability and print quality.

The LulzBot Taz Mini 2 and CraftBot Plus, which are both less priced, are also good choices. Even with a 20% increase in build volume over the previous generation, the Mini 2’s build volume is still minimal when compared to other printers in this price range, but it compensates by providing a true plug-and-play experience and being exceedingly easy to use.

Ultimately, one of the alternatives described below should work for you, whether you’re searching for a powerful machine that can print massive objects or an easy-to-use and dependable 3D printer.

Recommendation

The M2 3D printer from MakerGear is the oldest 3D printer on this list. That’s a plus when you consider how popular the M2 is among users for its dependability and print quality. It has a huge build volume, can reach 50 microns, and offers outstanding customer service. Finally, the MakerGear M2 is arguably one of the most dependable 3D printers under $2,000 on the market.

TECH SPECS

VOLUME 8″x10″x8″
RESOLUTION 50 microns
FIL. SIZE 1.75mm
MATERIALS ABS/PLA
PORTS USB/SD Card
PLATFORM Heated Bed
WEIGHT ~28 lbs.

MakerGear M2 Overview


The MakerGear M2 has been around for a while and is still one of the most well-reviewed and dependable consumer 3D printers available.

It has a build volume of 8′′ x 10′′ x 8′′, can achieve resolutions of 50 microns, and can print at speeds ranging from 80 mm/s to 200 mm/s.

The M2 does not come with dual extruders out of the box, but you may add them afterwards. The M2’s other flaw is that it isn’t as user-friendly as some of the other devices in this price bracket (or at higher price ranges.)

However, most users say the M2 is pretty simple to operate after the initial learning curve.

The MakerGear M2, like the Taz 6, lacks an enclosure, making it less reliable for ABS prints if you’re printing in a place where you don’t have adequate temperature control.

Overall, the MakerGear M2 is definitely your best bet if you don’t have hundreds of dollars to invest and want a competent 3D printer that will consistently churn out decent prints (once you get it configured right). It’s been tried and true as a reliable workhorse.

Recommendation

The CraftBotPlus is a mid-range 3D printer that has received positive feedback from users. It’s a simple-to-use 3D printer with a reasonable build capacity for the price. It costs roughly $600 less than MakerGear’s M2, so if you can’t afford the M2, the CraftBot Plus is a good alternative.

TECH SPECS

VOLUME 10″x8″x8″
RESOLUTION 100 microns
FIL. SIZE 1.75mm
MATERIALS ABS/PLA
PORTS USB
PLATFORM Heated Bed
WEIGHT ~31 lbs.

CraftBot Plus Overview

The CraftBot Plus is a more recent 3D printer that has gained popularity among its users. The CraftBot Plus has a build volume of 10′′ x 8′′ x 8′′, which is comparable to the MakerGear M2.

The CraftBot Plus is about $600 less expensive than the M2. The CraftBot Plus’ price, after all, is what sets it apart from the competitors.

However, there are several drawbacks to the CraftBot 3D printer. To begin with, it can only print at a resolution of 100 microns. It also has only one type of connectivity: USB. To print on this machine, you’ll need a computer nearby.

Its printing rates aren’t very impressive (50-200 mm/s), but they’re competitive in this price bracket.

Another disadvantage is that the CraftBot Plus does not come with two extruders, and there does not appear to be any way to upgrade to one.

Overall, the CraftBot Plus is a solid option if you’re searching for a modestly priced, easy-to-use, and reliable 3D printer with a huge build capacity.

Recommendation

The LulzBot Mini 2 is not the machine for you if you’re searching for a high build volume 3D printer (although, the new Mini 2 does come with a 20 percent increase in build volume over the original Mini). However, if you’re looking for a 3D printer that’s simple to set up and use, as well as a machine that you can count on to consistently produce high-quality prints, the Mini 2 is a machine worth considering.

TECH SPECS

VOLUME 6″x6″x7″
RESOLUTION 50 microns
FIL. SIZE 2.85mm
MATERIALS ABS/PLA/HIPS
PORTS USB & SD
PLATFORM Heated Bed
WEIGHT ~26 lbs.

LulzBot Mini 2 Overview

While the first LulzBot Mini’s construction space (6′′ x 6′′ x 6′′) was modest in comparison to the competition, its ease-of-use astonished me. The original Mini was one of the first 3D printers I tried, and it took less time to get it up and running than it did to unbox it and plug it in.

With the release of their Mini 2, LulzBot has improved the Mini, increasing the build volume by 20%. The original Mini had a print volume of 5.9′′ x 5.9′′ x 6.3′′, whereas the new Mini 2 has a build volume of 6.3′′ x 6.3′′ x 7.0′′ without expanding the machine’s total footprint.

The Mini 2 also features a redesigned belt-driven Z-axis for faster print speeds, tetherless printing, and quieter operation, as well as support for rigid and flexible filaments right out of the box.

Along with the new features, the Mini 2 retains the original Mini’s ease of use, print reliability, and plug-and-play capability. The Mini 2 is more expensive than the original Mini, so if you don’t require the slightly larger build volume or additional capabilities, you can save a few hundred dollars by acquiring the original Mini while it’s still available.

Under $1,000, the Best 3D Printers

The QIDI TECH I is my recommendation for under $1,000. In this price range, both printers are practically the same unit.

The FlashForge Creator Pro costs $250 more than the QIDI TECH I. Both machines, on the other hand, are sturdy equipment that will appeal to a wide range of users from beginners to experts.

Recommendation

For the best affordable 3D printer, I recommend the QIDI TECH I. The QIDI TECH I is a dual extruder printer with a large build volume that can be depended on to produce high-quality prints for just under $650. The QIDI TECH I isn’t the most polished printer on the market, but for the price and benefits, it’s a fantastic choice for beginners to intermediate users.

TECH SPECS

VOLUME 9″x6″x6″
RESOLUTION 100 microns
FIL. SIZE 1.75mm
MATERIALS ABS/PLA
PORTS USB/SD Card
PLATFORM Heated Bed
WEIGHT ~49 lbs.

QIDI TECH I Overview

My recommendation for the best 3D printer under $1,000 is the QIDI TECH I. For about $650, you can obtain a completely enclosed 3D printer with dual extruders and a build capacity of 9′′ x 6′′ x 6′′.

It’s unusual to find a dual extruding 3D printer for less than $1,000, let alone under $700, but the QIDI TECH I does.

The QIDI TECH I is virtually the same machine as the Creator Pro, as I indicated in the overview of the FlashForge 3D printer above. It’s merely $250 cheaper.

The QIDI TECH I (and Creator Pro) has a few drawbacks, including a lack of connectivity possibilities and the need for considerable fiddling to get it set up and functioning properly.

Also, because QIDI isn’t as well-known as FlashForge, customer assistance may be an issue. However, with nearly 400 customer reviews on Amazon, 90 percent of which are 4-star or above, I doubt you’ll have to worry about customer service.

Finally, if you’re new to 3D printing and want a machine that requires some tinkering (which will help you become more familiar with the technology) but also has the benefits and functionality of a high-end machine, the QIDI TECH I is a terrific alternative at an exceptionally low price. Intermediate-to-advanced users will benefit from the equipment as well.

Recommendation

If it weren’t for the fact that the QIDI TECH I is effectively the same machine for $250 less, the FlashForge Creator Pro would be my top pick for the best 3D printer under $1,000. If you’ve heard of the Creator Pro and are thinking about buying one, I strongly advise you to look into the QIDI TECH I first.

TECH SPECS

VOLUME 9″x6″x6″
RESOLUTION 100 microns
FIL. SIZE 1.75mm
MATERIALS ABS/PLA
PORTS SD Card/Micro-USB
PLATFORM Heated Bed
WEIGHT ~49 lbs.

FlashForge Creator Pro Overview

The FlashForge Creator Pro is a clone of MakerBot’s previous Replicator 2X. It essentially carved out a niche in the 3D printer business by delivering a machine that is remarkably comparable to the Replicator 2X but costs less.

The QIDI TECH I is now essentially doing to the Creator Pro what the Creator Pro did to the Replicator 2X. The QIDI TECH I is simply a rip-off of FlashForge’s Replicator 2X rip-off.

The good news is that both machines are extremely reliable and cost a reasonable amount of money.

The Creator Pro has a build volume of 9′′ x 6′′ x 6′′, dual extruders, a heated print bed, and the ability to print at 100 microns. To go with the Creator Pro, there are plenty of community-driven improvements and add-ons (and QIDI TECH I, as well).

The Creator Pro has the disadvantage of costing over $250 more than the QIDI TECH I for the same machine. It also doesn’t have a lot of connectivity possibilities and requires some fiddling to get up and running.

Finally, the sole advantage the Creator Pro has over the QIDI TECH I is superior support. That’s mainly due to the fact that FlashForge has been around longer than QIDI.

The Best 3D Printers for Less Than $500

You shouldn’t expect a hassle-free experience if you’re shopping for a 3D printer for under $500. There are a lot of possibilities once you get under $500, but they all require some type of tinkering, tuning, or regular maintenance to stay functioning at a high level.

And, while there are many possibilities in this price range, we recommend the HICTOP Creality CR-10 Prusa i3 kit for its large print volume and the Monoprice Make Select V2 for all it has to offer for its low price.

Recommendation

What if I told you that the second-largest print volume 3D printer on this list will only set you back $500? That’s exactly what the HICTOP Creality CR-10 has to offer. The Raise3D N2 Plus is the only printer on this list with a bigger print volume. Obviously, the CR-10 isn’t going to be as polished as the options above, but if you’re a novice looking for a reliable budget-friendly machine with a practically limitless print output, the CR-10 is a good option to explore.

TECH SPECS

VOLUME 12″x12″x16″
RESOLUTION I100 microns
FIL. SIZE 1.75mm
MATERIALS PLA
PORTS USB/SD Card
PLATFORM Heated (only 50-70°)
WEIGHT ~23 lbs.

HICTOP Creality CR-10 Overview

Under $500, the HICTOP Creality CR-10 is an intriguing 3D printer. This isn’t a professional-looking 3D printer. And that means it’ll take some fiddling to get everything set up and printing properly.

The CR-10, on the other hand, has some advantages. To begin with, it is really inexpensive. It’s also available as a kit.

Although 3D printer kits aren’t for everyone, if you’ve never used one before and are eager to learn more about the technology, I recommend starting with a kit as your first printer. You’ll be able to examine all of the machine’s operating parts, giving you a greater knowledge of how the technology works.

It will also assist you in the future if you need to repair a part or update your printer.

Another advantage of the CR-10 is its enormous printing capacity. And when I say outrageously enormous, I mean that the Raise3D N2 Plus, which costs $4,000, is the only other 3D printer on our list with a large print capacity.

The CR-10 will clearly not be as reliable as the N2 Plus (or most of the machines listed above the CR-10), but having the ability to print such enormous objects from such a little machine is undoubtedly worth something.

So, if you’re searching for a low-cost 3D printer that lets you go through the assembly process (to help you learn more about 3D printers) and doesn’t limit the size of the objects you can print, the HICTOP Creality CR-10 is a good option to consider.

Recommendation

The Monoprice Maker Select V2 is an economical alternative with a decent build volume (8′′ x 8′′ x 7′′) with a heated print bed if you’re on a tight budget and just want to experience what 3D printing is all about. It’s a wonderful choice for beginners who want to get their feet wet, as well as for children/students who want to learn something new.

TECH SPECS

VOLUME 8″x8″x7″
RESOLUTION 100 microns
FIL. SIZE 1.75mm
MATERIALS ABS/PLA
PORTS microSD
PLATFORM Heated Bed
WEIGHT ~27 lbs.

Monoprice Maker Select V2 Overview

The cost of a 3D printer does not have to be prohibitive. In reality, there are a plethora of low-cost solutions available that are ideal for beginners to try out before deciding whether or not they want to get into technology.

The Monoprice Maker Select V2 is a sub-$300 printer with a large build capacity (8′′ x 8′′ x 7′′) with a heated bed that allows you to print using ABS filament.

Nobody is going to be blown away by the Maker Select. It is, however, the ideal 3D printer for novices for under $300.

It’s vital to keep in mind that you shouldn’t expect miracles from one of these low-cost 3D printers. However, dealing with the challenges that arise with some of these less expensive equipment is an important part of mastering the technology.

So, whether you want to get into 3D printing, or if you want an inexpensive alternative to show your child or pupils (if you’re a teacher) how the technology works, the Monoprice Maker Select V2 is a great place to start.

Which 3D Printer Should You Use?

This list only touches the surface of the vast array of 3D printers available. We’ve listed a few of the greatest printers in each price category, but because there are so many different printers on the market, we don’t claim this to be the be-all and end-all of 3D printer recommendations.

We want to return on a regular basis to keep you up to date as new 3D printers become available.

However, the 3D printer that is perfect for you will be determined by your budget, followed by whether or not you value reliability, ease-of-use, the ability to be set up quickly, and, most crucially, print quality.

Finally, we believe that this list will assist you in locating a 3D printer that meets your requirements. If you disagree and believe a printer should be added on this list, please let us know in the comments section below!

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Evangeline Christina is a Cyber Security Enthusiast, Security Blogger, Technical Editor, Certified Ethical Hacker, Author at Cyberspecial.net. Previously, he worked as a security news reporter in a reputed news agency.

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